About Chris

   “an eccentric guru who knows where all the best fossils are.” The New York Times  2018


"A walk with Chris is like having the blindfold taken off."  clients comment on a recent walk.


Christopher  Michael Pamplin B.Sc. (Hons)

Geologist

Fossil  walks leader since 1997
Fossil hunter since age of about 10 ( A long time)
 


Chris  was born and raised in Devon and has been fascinated by geology and the sea since  a very young age. "My first fossil find was a Devil's Toe Nail found at  Southerndown in South Wales, then someone showed me his fossil collection, I was  hooked!"

Chris  studied geology at O' level, then A' level and graduated from Plymouth in 1986  where he read applied geology and geography.

 He has previously worked as an engineering geologist and published Britain’s  first magazine for fossil collectors and enthusiasts in the 1980’s. From  1997 to 2002 he worked as Geological Warden at Charmouth Heritage Coast  Centre, becoming Senior Warden before he left. He was also a member of the Coastguard  while he worked there.
From 2002 -2006 he was Earth Science Advisor for the Jurassic Coast World  Heritage Site. He is now self employed with his own business Fossilwalks.com.


 Chris has featured on several television programs including:
The  Genius of Darwin Channel 4
The Natural History of Britain BBC
Naturparadiese  Europas-German TV
Country File x 2
Wild West Country
Wild about Dorset
 Cadles Quest
Spotlight
Meridian Tonight
Westcountry Live
What  the Victorians did for us
Walk  this way 


Chris and his fossil walks were recently featured in The New York Times travel section.

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Chris said

 "My first expedition to Charmouth on the Jurassic Coast was in 1978, I was just 16 and in those days my guide was a book called “A fossil Hunters Diary”. I saw very few people on the beach and still have ammonites in my collection from that day.    Since then I have taken 1000's of people to enjoy the same experience ."  His nic name "Hawk Eye" was given to him by a client because he sees very small fossils without bending down.

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